National Animal of British Indian Ocean Territory

National Animal of British Indian Ocean Territory

The Striated Heron is the national animal of British Indian Ocean Territory. These herons are small in size with a black forehead and crown, black back and grey under parts. The national bird of British Indian Ocean Territory also has bright yellow-orange legs. It is due to the beautiful features of the Striated Heron that has made citizens consider it as the national animal of British Indian Ocean Territory.

These herons live among the mangrove forests, mudflats and oyster-beds. You can easily find them in both freshwater and saltwater marshes because that is where there is abundance of their food. They mostly feed on crustaceans, amphibians, insects and fish. The national bird of British Indian Ocean Territory can also be found in Africa, Asia, Australia, Madagascar, Colombia, Venezuela and also the new land.  Mostly, British Indian Ocean Territory’s national animal forages alone along rivers and in the mangrove forests.

Facts about the national animal of British Indian Ocean Territory (Heron)

  • Common name: Striated Heroin
  • Scientific name: Butorides striata
  • Average weight: 193-235g
  • Average length: 35-45cm
  • Habitat: Mangrove forests, mudflats and oyster-beds
  • Diet: fish, amphibians, insects and crustaceans

The heron feeds solitarily and defends its feeding territory alone. As stated, it is small, has short legs with a grey neck. An adult heroin has a green black crown with erectile chest. Its irises are orange yellow in color. Its back is dark grey with a green cast while its feathers are elongated mostly towards the tail. Female Striated Heroin birds are slightly smaller and duller than their male counter parts. This small beautiful bird has been celebrated as the national animal symbol of British Indian Ocean Territory for long.

The above features, including many other benefits of the Striated Heron birds has make it qualify as the national symbol of British Indian Ocean Territory.

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