National Animal of Chile

National Animal of Chile

South Andean Huemul is the national animal of Chile. This species of deer has an odd stance. The huemul are known by five different names, Patagonian huemul, Chilean huemal, South Andean deer, South Andean huemul and Chilean huemul. Chile’s national animal, the huemul are looks like the deer with short legs. Although once prolific throughout the Andean region of Chile and Argentina, the national animal of Chile the population of South Andean huemul has been dwindling rapidly.

 

Huemul are seen to the southern Argentina and Chile. Some historical records says that Huemul were once found in a wide band along the southern Andes as well as southern Patagonia. Since 1982, it has been registered as Endangered on the IUCN red list of Threatened Species. Estimates Suggest that national animal symbol of Chile are may be only 1500 remain, two-thirds of which are thought to red side in Chile.

Facts about the national animal of Chile (Huemul)

  • Common Name: Huemul
  • Trinomen: Hippocamelusbisulcus
  • Found in: southern Argentina and Chile
  • Habitat: forests of southern beech or dense shrubland
  • Color: White Tawny, Gold, Blonde, Brown.
  • Average Length: Male 140 – 175 cm, Female 140 – 157 cm.
  • Average Height: 80 – 90 cm
  • Average Weight: Male – 174.9 kg and Female – 119.5 kg
  • Average Lifespan: 14 yearsin wild
  • Average Speed: 60-80 km/h
  • Current number: 60 in recent years.

The Huemul’s legs are very short and his hind legs appear bent. They have coarse, brown fur which is short and dark in summer, but will lengthen and lighten to protect them from wind-chill temperatures. It has a large black nose, small eyes and has large ears lined with white fur. The males are larger than the female. They have branching antlers that grow up to 35 centimeters before being shed each year. They eat different species of plants. And the average lifespan is up to 14 years.

National Symbol of Chile, the Huemul has been registered as Endangered on the IUCN red list of Threatened.

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