National Animal of Finland

National Animal of Finland

The chestnut bear, also known as the brown bear is the national animal of Finland. In Northern Eurasia and North America, the brown bear is considered the biggest carnivoran. It is large in size, only being rivaled by the polar bear, which belongs to the same class as the brown bear. The claws of the national animal of Finland are large and curved with those on the front limbs being longer than those on the hind limbs. This is to enable them tear into flesh, which is their main diet.

Finland’s national animal is mostly found in the Arctic Tundra regions. They can also be found in dense forests, subalpine meadows and open plains. They are widely spread in Russia, America and Canada. There total population is approximated to be around 200,000 by the 2012 animal survey (IUCN, 2012). Their status is listed by the IUCN as slightest concerned species even though their numbers keep on decreasing.

Facts about the National Animal of Finland (Brown bear)

  • Common name: Brown bear
  • Scientific name: Ursus Arctos
  • Lifespan: 20-25 years
  • Average weight: 180-1300 lbs
  • Average length: 4.6-9.2 ft
  • Gestation period: 180-270 days
  • Diet: Rodents, moose, nuts, fruits, berries and leaves
  • Main predator: Tigers, human beings and other bears

Basically, bears are covered with brown fur all over their bodies. This fur protects them against the cold during winter season. Adult bears have a massive, heavily built concave skulls. Their forehead is high and rises steeply too. Their most distinctive feature is the shoulder hump. This hump contains energy which helps the bear to dig up roots in search of food. Perhaps it is due to this excessive energy that the brown bear was declared the national animal symbol of Finland.

In general, the brown bear is a very unique and distinct animal. Hunting them is highly discouraged and when it was hunted, a sacred ritual had to be performed in order to pacify its vengeful spirit. This was a way of protecting this national symbol of Finland from extinction.

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