National Animal of Gaza Strip

National Animal of Gaza Strip

The Eastern Imperial Eagle is the national animal of Gaza Strip. It is stocky in shape with black-brown feathers and with a pale golden crown and nape. The national bird of Gaza strip is also known as the Asian Imperial Eagle. It is a solitary animal, doing its activities solitarily. At the age of about 4 years, the national animal of Gaza Strip finds a partner which it lives with for the rest of its life. This is to say, Gaza Strip’s national animal is a monogamous animal.

The Eastern Imperial Eagle is usually found in forests, steppe and also agricultural areas with large tress. You should also not be surprised to find it in semi-desert regions and riverine forests. The national bird of Gaza strip is listed on the IUCN red list as a vulnerable animal. Their population size is between 2500 and 9999 and the population trend is decreasing.

Facts about the National Animal of Gaza Strip (Eastern Imperial Eagle)

  • Common name: Eastern Imperial Eagle
  • Scientific name: Aquila heliaca
  • Average weight: 2.45-4.55kgs
  • Average height: 72-90cm
  • Incubation period: 43 days
  • Habitat: Forests, steppe and agricultural areas
  • Diet: Omnivores

They have black-brown feathers and a pale golden crown and nape. Shoulders have white patches and tail is grey in color. Young ones are paler with patterning on the rump, wings and tail. They mostly feed on fresh flesh they kill themselves. This fact that they cannot eat a dead animal qualifies the Eastern Imperial Eagle as the national animal symbol of Gaza Strip. The bird’s population is constantly declining due to habitat destruction and degradation. During the breeding season, the female lays between 2 and 4 eggs which take about 43 days to hatch. The most interesting thing about these bird is that its weakest sibling is starved to death and only feeds the strong ones.

The ability of the Eastern Imperial Eagle to share the responsibility of incubation makes it to be considered the national symbol of Gaza Strip.

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