National Animal of Guatemala

National Animal of Guatemala

National Animal of Guatemala is quetzal. Quetzal is a medium sized bird and they are Animalia and class Aves. Guatemala’s National Animal, quetzal is found mostly in the rainforest area. Important to realize, quetzal is the national Bird of Guatemala too. It has a long tail with the blue and green body. The bird is so beautiful and it represents the beauty, love, light and happiness. For this reason, this awesome bird is considered as the national animal symbol of Guatemala.

Quetzal is a bird of beauty and liberty. They have made their national symbol with this bird and two Bay Laurel branches. They are focusing the victory and liberty at the same time by this innocent bird. The color of Quetzal is Green, Blue, Red, White, Bronze, Grey, Brown and they are also known as “Trogol” in different places. The number of their population is near 50,000. The worst environment of this bird is habitat loss and capture.

Facts about National Animal of Guatemala

  • Scientific Name: Pharomachrus, Euptilotis
  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Chordata
  • Class: Aves
  • Family: Trogonidae
  • Genus: Pharomachrus, Euptilotis
  • Size (H): 35cm – 40.5cm (14in – 16in)
  • Weight: 200g – 225g (7oz – 8oz)
  • Life Span: 20 – 25 years
  • Diet: Omnivore
  • Prey: Fruits, Berries, Insects
  • Predators: Squirrels, Owls, Hawks
  • Conservation Status: Threatened

The scientific name of Quetzal is Pharomachrus, Euptilotis. It is a medium sized bird and their size goes nearly 35 cm to 40.5 cm (14in – 16in). Their weight goes nearly 200g – 225g (7oz – 8oz). On the other hand, They take as meal Fruits, Berries, and Insects. Similarly, their lifespan goes nearly 20 to 25 years. Surely, Guatemala has made this amazing bird as their national symbol of Guatemala. First thing to remember, specialists are giving warning for their existence between 50 years. So ensuring their good environment will be the next target for Guatemala.

By considering their all the facts Guatemala is holding the bird as their national identity.

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