State Animal of Utah

State Animal of Utah

Cervus Canadensis Is The National State Animal of Utah. The Rocky Mountain Elk or Cervus canadensis was adopted on February 1, 1971. Before European settlement, an estimated ten million elk roamed the North American continent. Utah State Animal Rocky Mountain Elk (Cervus elaphus), or wapiti, a Native American word meaning “white rump,” once had the largest range of any deer species in North America.

For centuries, the elk have been a picturesque icon of the American West and has provided recreational opportunities for hunters, photographers, artists, and other wildlife enthusiasts. State Animal of Utah Unregulated hunting, grazing competition from domestic livestock, and habitat destruction from unrestrained timber harvesting, urbanization, and westward expansion throughout the nineteenth century reduced American elk populations to less than 100,000 individuals continent-wide by the early 1900s.

State Animal of Utah These factors, coupled with concentrated wildlife management efforts, have returned the American elk to stable, and in some areas increasing, populations in the United States and Canada. This pamphlet is designed to serve as an introduction to elk habitat requirements and to assist private landowners and managers in developing elk management plans.

Utah State Animal The success of any individual species management plan depends on targeting the specific needs of the desired species, analyzing the designated habitat area as a whole to ensure that all required habitat elements are present, and determining what management techniques will best improve the land as elk habitat. Utah State Animal The elk became the official animal and the rainbow trout became the official state fish of the State of Utah when Governor Rampton signed Senate Bill No. 18 and Senate Bill No. 19 on February 1, 1971. The law designating the elk as the official Utah state animal is found in the Utah Code, Title 63G, Chapter 1, Section 601.

 

Here is the taxonomy of elk according to the Integrated Taxonomic Information System (ITIS):

Kingdom: Animalia

Subkingdom: Bilateria

Infrakingdom: Deuterostomia

Phylum: Chordata

Subphylum: Vertebrata

Infraphylum: Gnathostomata

Superclass: Tetrapoda

Class: Mammalia

Subclass: Theria

Infraclass: Eutheria

Order: Artiodactyla

Family: Cervidae

Subfamily: Cervinae

Genus: Cervus

Species: Cervus elaphus

 

State Animal of Utah Elk is also called wapiti. This is a Native American word meaning “light-colored deer,” according to National Geographic. State Animal of Utah is also called red deer. Bulls grow new antlers every year. New antlers are covered with a soft coating called velvet. When the males fight for mates they rub off all of their velvet by bashing their antlers together during fights of dominance.