State Coat of Arms Of Delaware

State Coat of Arms Of Delaware

The Official Blazon of the Delaware State Coat of Arms Was Enacted by the State Legislature in 1847. According To The Basic Design of the state seal, the State Coat of Arms Of Delaware was originally adopted on January 17, 1777, The work of developing a seal had been entrusted in October 1776 to a joint committee of the two houses of the legislature, which (after a horrendous first concept offered by the committee in early November) eventually consulted with the Philadelphia heraldic artist Pierre Eugene du Simitiere on the matter.

On January 17, 1777, the committee presented its final Delaware State Coat of Arms recommendation for a seal, which it described as “a Sheaf of Wheat, an ear of Indian Corn and an Ox in full Stature, in a Shield, with a River dividing the Wheat Sheaf and Ear of Indian Corn from the Ox, which is to be cut [i.e., on the seal die] on the nether part of the shield below the river; that the Supporters be an American soldier under arms on the right and a Husbandman with a hoe in his hand on the left; and that a Ship be the Crest.” The legislature accepted this State Coat of Arms Of Delaware design the same day.

 

Symbols on Delaware Coat of Arms:

  • The ship in the Coat of Arms is a symbol of New Castle County’s shipbuilding industry and the state’s extensive coastal commerce.
  • The farmer with the hoe represents the central role of farming to the state.
  • The soldier, a militiaman with his musket, recognizes the crucial role of the citizen-soldier to the maintenance of American liberties.
  • The motto “Liberty and Independence” was provided by the Order of the Cincinnati, a hereditary organization of American Revolutionary War officers, formed in 1783.
  • The sheaf of wheat Delaware State Coat of Arms is taken from the Sussex County seal and signifies the agricultural vitality of the state.
  • The ear of corn State Coat of Arms Of Delaware was taken from the Kent County seal and symbolizes the agricultural basis of the state’s economy.
  • The blue stripe, above the ox, represents the Delaware River, the mainstay of the state’s commerce and transportation.
  • The ox represents the importance of animal husbandry to the state’s economy.