State Fish Of Alaska

State Fish Of Alaska

Chinook Salmon Is The State Fish Of Alaska. It was adopted As The Official fish of Alaska State in 1962. The Fish also called king salmon, spring salmon, quinnat, tyee, tule, and blackmouth salmon. The king salmon fish is native to the Pacific coast of North America. State Fish Of Alaska King salmon weighing up to 100 lb. have been caught in Alaska. The name of the fish chinook is derived from the tribal name of the Indians that once lived along the Columbia River.

The Scientific name of Chinook Salmon Is Oncorhynchus tshawytscha. The Alaska State Fish Chinook is the largest of the Pacific salmon species, the world record standing at 57.27 kilograms (126 pounds). Chinook is also known as “spring” salmon because they return to some rivers earlier than other Pacific salmon species. This species is known as piscivorous, meaning that they eat other fish.

 

Facts About Chinook Salmon:

  1. Chinook Salmon Pacific Ocean habitat ranges all the way from Southern California to the Canadian Arctic.
  2. The Chinook is the biggest of all of the Pacific salmons, growing as long as 53 inches and weighing as much as 126 pounds.
  3. The Alaska State Fish Chinook salmon is also a major part of commercial fishing operations in Oregon.
  4. The king salmon is born in freshwater, migrates to the ocean during the second year of its life, and swims back to freshwater by the age of seven years to spawn and then die.
  5. Young salmon consume plankton and later insects while in the streams, before moving on to creatures like herring, squid, pilchard, and crustaceans in the ocean habitat, reported State Symbols USA.
  6. Even today, State Fish Of Alaska salmon remain an important source of food for humans, who eat the meat fresh, frozen, canned, or smoked, the Oregon Blue Book said.

 

Fast Facts:

Size:

Length = 36 inches (Record: 58 inches); Weight = 30 lbs (Record: 126 lbs).

Lifespan:

3 to 7 years

Distribution/Range:

North America “– Monterey Bay, CA’ to the Chukchi Sea. Asia – Hokkaido, Japan to Anadyr River, Siberia

Diet / Feeding Type:

Plankton, insects, amphipods, and fish

Predators:

Birds and fish eat juveniles; marine mammals eat adults

Reproduction:

Anadromous and semelparous

Remarks:

On March 25th, 1963, the Chinook salmon became the official state fish of Alaska

Other Names:

Chinook, chins, king. quinnat, tyee, tule, blackmouth, and spring salmon.