State Tree Of Michigan

State Tree Of Michigan

Eastern White Pine Is The Official State Tree Of Michigan. Michigan Adopted the towering eastern white pine (Pinus strobus) as the official state tree in 1955 as a symbol of Michigan’s rich logging history. The Eastern White Pine is considered to be the tallest tree in eastern North America. Michigan State Tree White Pine is the largest conifer of the eastern and upper Midwest forests, reaching 150 feet in height and up to 40 inches in diameter.

In dense stands, trees produce tall, cylindrical stems with pyramidal-shaped crowns, characterized by distinctive, plate-like branching, especially noticeable as the trees become older.  On young growth, the bark remains rather thin, smooth, and greenish-brown in color. On older trees, the bark becomes deeply fissured and dark grayish-brown in color. State Tree Of Michigan evergreen needles is in clusters of 5, soft, flexible, 2 1/2 to 5 inches long, and bluish-green in appearance. Its cones are about 4 to 8 inches long and 1 inch thick.

These remain attached for 1 to several months after ripening in the autumn of the second season. Michigan State Tree White Pine was a standard wood of commerce up to the early part of the 1900s. Traditional uses for white pine came about because it is soft, easy to machine, relatively strong for its density. It has been extensively used for interior trim, paneling, cabinets, furniture, matches, general construction lumber, pulp, sashes, door trim, veneers, and canoes.  It has been grown for Christmas trees, its pitch used for waterproofing, and its foliage used as a mattress stuffing.

 

Identification Of The Eastern White Pine:

 

Leaf: Eastern White Pine Leaf are Evergreen and 3 to 5 inches long, with five blue-green, slender needles per fascicle. A fascicle sheath is not present. Needles appear blue because of 3 or more lines of stomata.

Flower: Flower of Eastern White Pine are Monoecious; males cylindrical, yellow, in clusters near branch tips; females light green, tinged in red, at ends of branches.

Fruit: Cones are 4 to 7 inches long, cylindrical, with thin, rounded cone scales, very resinous. Cones are borne on a long stalk. Maturing August to September.

Twig: Slender, gray-green to orange-brown in color.

Bark: On young Eastern White Pine trees; thin, smooth and gray-green in color. Later becoming thick, reddish-brown to gray-brown with prominent ridges and furrows.

Form: A large tree with a very straight stem. The crown is conical when young, later developing wispy, horizontal branches.