The Seal Of Oklahoma State

The Seal Of Oklahoma State

The Oklahoma State Seal incorporates the 1905 design for a proposed Indian state of Sequoyah that would have included five Indian republics. The United States rejected Sequoyah’s bid for statehood but merged the area with Oklahoma Territory, which became a state in 1907. The Seal Of Oklahoma shows a five-pointed star, each point bearing the seal of one of the Indian nations; the large star is surrounded by 45 small ones.

The state Seal Of Oklahoma has an added central scene depicting a pioneer and an Indian shaking hands below the figure of Liberty. The state seal was designed by Gabe E. Parker and its elements are described in the Oklahoma Constitution. The Seal Of Oklahoma is circular and features a five-pointed star in the center. Within the star is the basic design of the seal of the Territory of Oklahoma and with the words Labor Omnia Vincit, which means “work conquers all things.” Columbia, a symbol of justice and statehood, stands to hold the scales of justice.

In front of her, a pioneer farmer and an American Indian stand clasping hands. Inside the rays of the star are emblems of the Five Tribes. The ray pointing directly upward contains a symbol of the Chickasaw Nation: an Indian warrior holding a bow. The upper-right ray features symbols of the Choctaw Nation: a tomahawk, bow, and three crossed arrows. The lower-right ray features symbols of the Seminole Nation: a village with houses and a factory next to a lake on which a man paddles a canoe.

The lower-left ray contains symbols of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation: a sheaf of wheat and a plow. The upper-left ray features symbols of the Cherokee Nation: a seven-pointed star surrounded by a wreath of oak leaves. In the background of the Seal Of Oklahoma, surrounding the main star, are forty-five smaller stars, representing the forty-five states in the Union when Oklahoma became the forty-sixth state. The words “GREAT SEAL OF THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA 1907” appear in a circular band around the seal.