The Seal Of Vermont State

The Seal Of Vermont State

The Great Seal of the State of Vermont is the official seal of the U.S. state of Vermont, used to emboss and authenticate official documents. It was designed by Ira Allen, brother of Ethan Allen and one of the state’s founders. Ira Allen designed the Great Seal of Vermont.  Reuben Dean carved the image. Vermont adopted the seal in 1779 before Vermont became a state! Vermont used a different seal from 1821 to 1937. Then Vermont chose Allen’s seal again. The pictures in the seal show things that were important to the settlers.

The cow and the wheat represent farming.  The trees and the wavy lines represent mountains and lakes. The tall tree in the middle is a pine tree. Some people say the pine tree represents freedom from the king of England. “Freedom & Unity” is Vermont’s state motto. This reminds us to protect our freedom. But we must also work together as a state. Intended for use to emboss official documents, the Seal Of Vermont is not intended for decorative use, the single exception being a large version carved in hardwood and affixed to the Vermont Pavilion at the Expo 67 World’s Fair.

That Seal Of Vermont was later used as a backdrop behind the podium in the Vermont State House Press Briefing Room, which is now the minority party’s caucus room. The large wooden Great Seal of Vermont has been moved to the working offices of the governor of Vermont at The Pavilion. A more naturalistic and colorful armorial representation of the elements of the seal can be seen in the coat of arms of Vermont, which is found on the Vermont flag. It is also used on letterheads and on signs marking state buildings, bridges, state’s borders, and at Vermont welcome centers.

By Vermont statute, the Great Seal of Vermont is the shared domain of the Vermont Secretary of State, the offices of the state governorship, and the legislative and judiciary branches of government. The original metal dies for the first seal of Vermont are stored at the Secretary of State’s office at Redstone, a large red brick and sandstone Queen Anne style house at Montpelier.